Sanjay Ruparelia

Sanjay Ruparelia
  • Jarislowsky Democracy Chair, Ryerson University

Sanjay Ruparelia is the Jarislowsky Democracy Chair, and Associate Professor of Politics and Public Administration, at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. He is the author of Divided We Govern: coalition politics in modern India (Hurst and Oxford University Press, 2015), a study of the rise and fall of the broader Indian left; editor of The Indian Ideology: three responses to Perry Anderson (Permanent Black, 2015); and co-editor of Understanding India’s New Political Economy: a great transformation? (Routledge, 2011). He has also published a range of articles and essays on courts and constitutionalism, developmental states, power-sharing in federal parliamentary democracies, growth and inequality, high judicial activism, institutional centrism, models of governance, the politics of recognition, rights and welfare and the role of judgment in politics in edited volumes (Harvard, Oxford, Routledge) and scholarly journals (Comparative Politics, Economic & Political Weekly, International Journal for Politics, Culture and Society, Pacific Affairs and South Asia).

Dr. Ruparelia is currently preparing two book manuscripts, provisionally titled Contesting a Right to Welfare: law, citizenship and accountability in India and A New Path to Welfare: rights and constitutionalism in the global South. The first examines the role, successes and failures of lawyers, activists and judges in advancing rights claims, socioeconomic welfare and political accountability in the world’s largest democracy since the 1970s. The second compares India’s experience vis-à-vis analogous developments in China, South Africa and Brazil. It is part of a wider research agenda that analyzes the causes and ramifications of their respective trajectories in the evolving world order.

Prior to the New School, Dr. Ruparelia was Associate Professor of Politics at the New School for Social Research, and Assistant Director of the South Asia Institute and Lecturer in International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, in New York, USA. His research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Commonwealth Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies and Social Science Research Council as well as the universities of Cambridge, New School, Notre Dame, Princeton and Yale. Dr. Ruparelia has served as a consultant to the United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Research Institute on Social Development and the Asia Foundation. He earned a B.A. (First Class Honors) in Political Science from McGill University, and a M.Phil (Distinction) in Sociology and Politics of Development and Ph.D. in Politics from the University of Cambridge.